pritikasarkar

Pritika Sarkar Sarkar itibaren La Chaussade, Fransa itibaren La Chaussade, Fransa

Okuyucu Pritika Sarkar Sarkar itibaren La Chaussade, Fransa

Pritika Sarkar Sarkar itibaren La Chaussade, Fransa

pritikasarkar

I found this book as compelling as the first. I spent the first wondering how Claire got back to modern times, and got no answer--and this second book answers that question quite thoroughly. And now we add in Roger Wakefield and Claire's daughter Brianna, both of whom are quite interesting, and more really cool historical stuff. I knew none of this information before reading this book: the '45 and Coloddun (Sp?--I listened to this on audio) is all completely new territory to me.

pritikasarkar

When I first started reading, I was so bored with everything that I had to put it down. I couldn’t imagine how this story could get very interesting after the first few chapters. I thought, “They’re dead. So what? The way they’re portrayed isn’t spectacularly different from being alive.” So, I set it aside for about a month before picking it back up again. However, upon returning I was pleasantly surprised with how e everything turned out. Until late in the story, the characters are really nothing special. They are merely a group of children in an unfamiliar situation, and the only thing preventing everything from devolving into Lord of the Flies is the fact that none of the dead –“Afterlights” as they’re called- can feel physical pain or hunger and have a predilection towards comforting monotony. Yet, the one thing that continued to impress me until the very end is the superb world building put into Everlost. As you read on and discover the various unique was in which characters are capable of interacting with Everlost, the ghost world they inhabit as well as the mortal world is something very fascinating. It is the recurring folly of modern fantasy to ignore the “normal” world so to speak, so seeing the connections of the Afterlights to the world of the living and their desire to be a part of it again (or stubborn rejection of it as a coping mechanism) is a much needed element that helps make the story more relatable. The plot is slow to start, but by the third act everything is worth it. The pacing and tension ratchet up immensely, and every single character changes into something better –if not at least more interesting- than what they originally were at the start. Lastly, I love the little lessons or purposes the characters are left with when confronted with the idea of “moving on”. Not everyone is left with a purpose. Those who have been are resolved to embark on another journey in order to do what they must –pretty standard fare. However, I truly appreciate what became of those characters with no direct purpose. They recognize that they have a choice in whatever happens next, and have taken their next steps according to their own will rather than some divine purpose –it’s those individuals that I really respect for the message they give. Overall, Everlost remains a book I highly recommend. It’s a fun and interesting read that I believe could become an excellent series now that the initial world-building is established.

pritikasarkar

jenny this is me asking to borrow this from you when you are done.