shaviperera

Shavindra Perera Perera itibaren Kashidi, West Bengal, Hindistan itibaren Kashidi, West Bengal, Hindistan

Okuyucu Shavindra Perera Perera itibaren Kashidi, West Bengal, Hindistan

Shavindra Perera Perera itibaren Kashidi, West Bengal, Hindistan

shaviperera

This isn't a bad horror novel, but it's a pretty forgettable one, which is probably why McCammon pulled it from circulation. I think that judgement a bit too severe, given it's genre writing in the first place (lighten up McCammon). But hey, it's his call. The book actually starts out well, with McCammon effectively mixing some exotic elements (Nazis, voodoo, zombies), into some decent dread. The problem is that once the zombies (or more appropriately, flesh eating mummies) show up, the wheels start to come off. Like so many horror novels of this period, there's a rush toward apocalypse, which, to my mind, often moved such novels out of the horror box and into some sort of sci-fi/fantasy/adventure zone. In any event, the sense of horror quickly evaporates, and you have an ending that borrows heavily on Moby Dick and Jaws. (The last 50 pages felt like a 100.) One of the major problems with the novel is that the main character, David Moore, is bland and uninteresting. McCammon attempts to make him a haunted and fated type, but as the novel draws to an end, you can't help but feel that most of the secondary characters are more interesting (and many of them ARE interesting). McCammon can write, and it's clear he did some research here (especially with U-boats). The dialogue (at least until the by-the-numbers ending), was also pretty good. Given that much of dialogue comes from Caribbean characters, that's no small feat (especially for a young writer). Recommended only for fans of 1980s horror (which I am), and McCammon completists. (Good cheesy cover art.) If you're just a casual reader of RM, his later books are better. 2 1/2 stars, which I'm rounding down since the author has such low regard for it. I think he's wrong, but whatever. Cover Art: 3 Stars.