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Adalius Diend Diend itibaren Krông Nô District, Dak Nong, Vietnam itibaren Krông Nô District, Dak Nong, Vietnam

Okuyucu Adalius Diend Diend itibaren Krông Nô District, Dak Nong, Vietnam

Adalius Diend Diend itibaren Krông Nô District, Dak Nong, Vietnam

adaliusdiend

william powell ve myrna loy ile film uyarlaması kitaptan daha iyi olmasına rağmen hoşuma gitti.

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adaliusdiend

If you read only one book on the American Revolution (I'd go so far as to say 'only one book on American history') make it this one. I borrowed this from the library to take on vacation because my family history searches made me curious to know more about this period than I did. Much of the history we were taught about this period was "great men" and "great battles", accompanied by examining hagiographic paintings made either at the time (Benjamin Rush) or later, in the 19th Century. In a way, none of it made real sense. Was the Stamp Act the only thing the American colonists got excited about? Or quartering troops? What did it really mean to say 'no taxation without representation'? Why could Jefferson write the preamble to the Declaration of Independence yet continue to hold slaves? There's no straight answer. The 35 years leading up to the outbreak of the Revolution were times of great change, upheaval and complexity. The 'people' weren't even 'a people' but a diverse lot of different groups: wealthier and poorer, newer immigrants and old settlers, farmers and countrymen and city-dwellers, merchants, artisans, workers, land-owners and tenants, slaves, a few free blacks and Indians, men and women, scattered over different colonies with different settlement patterns, religious orientations, and different histories. When some people said: 'no taxation without representation' they weren't talking about representation in the British Parliament, but about the narrow franchise that limited voting rights, including locally, to landholders with estates valued at at least £40, and about local taxes and local impositions, though these were exacerbated by fiscal policies emanating from the British crown and Parliament. At the outset of the crisis, there were no cries for abolition, but these quickly began, first from religious conviction and then because many found themselves in the quandary of advocating 'freedom' from British oppression when they themselves were oppressors of black Africans forcibly taken from their homeland to live in perpetual and inheritable servitude forever. And Native Americans were faced with the difficulties of living with encroaching white settlers. Nash does a great service for the reader in bringing to one work all these (and other) disparate influences: class, location, economic woes, slavery, a distant government with local support (the Loyalists), women who began to believe that they too should have the rights to a say in their own government, Native Americans seeing their lands and livelihoods (and often their lives) snatched away. My only niggle was that there are a few annoying editorial slips here and there. Since originally posting this review I have found that those of my ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War weren't as overjoyed with what they were left with after 1789 as the standard histories would have us believe. A sheaf of over 50 pages of letters has come into my hands, and the writers (farmers and artisans all) all, clearly, believed themselves let down in the long run. I thank Gary Nash's book for prompting me to look further, in primary sources.