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Ani Eos Eos itibaren Giro, Nijerya itibaren Giro, Nijerya

Okuyucu Ani Eos Eos itibaren Giro, Nijerya

Ani Eos Eos itibaren Giro, Nijerya

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book about perversion, poverty, women and desperation in Japan. Also, peripherally, about yakuza and yakusa wannabees. Will never eat a bento box without thinking of it.

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** spoiler alert ** The White Tiger is an great novel on someone's rise to the higher social class within India. For a novel that mostly has connections with China & India, I enjoyed this book. The author, Aravind Adiga, did a great job expressing the troubles that is in India in a completely fictional book. Balram Halwai is a current entrepreneur who writes letters to Wen Jiabao, friend in China, about his story of rising in the corrupt system working class in India. Balram, a man born without a name, gains the alias as The White Tiger for being very educated in his village. It is mentioned that The White Tiger is a rare creature that appears once per generation. This connects to the Balram’s determination of escaping what he calls “The Rooster Coop”. The Rooster Coop is Balram’s allusion of roosters and their butcher to how servants in India remain to be honest and non rebellious to their cruel boss. Balram sets off his family’s destiny of being sweet makers, derived from his Hindu last name Halwai, & becomes a driver for a rich man’s son named Ashok. Not all goes well when Balram is treated as a servant by his boss, & family back in Delhi begs for rupees (Indian money) every month. Balram then makes a plan to escape this corrupt system & live in wealth, though the only way of achieving this was to kill his Ashok who was in conflicts of his own. Balram steals Ashok’s money, leaves with his nephew Dahram, & creates his own driving company under his new name Ashok Sharma. The novel itself is an interesting piece of literature as Balram grows up to things in India that are unfair but has no sense of change in the future. The involvement of murdering his boss in order to change his lifestyle gives a different aspect to killing. Ashok was very generous to Balram compared to his father, The Stork, who would come out as the average cruel rich man. This would come to Balram’s advantage of overcoming the obstacle of living in poverty like most families by killing him and getting away with it easily. Balram is not an innocent man at all with his actions, but the culture & society that he lived in shows how one must take a life to create a new one.

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I listened to the audio version and found the characters believable, sometimes infuriating, and compelling. I think listening to it, rather than reading it, gave me even more appreciation for Waldman's use of language than I would have had. I tend to read quickly when I want to find out "what happened next," but audio makes you take your time.