be_david

Julian Bernal Bernal itibaren 74026 Marina di Pulsano Taranto, İtalya itibaren 74026 Marina di Pulsano Taranto, İtalya

Okuyucu Julian Bernal Bernal itibaren 74026 Marina di Pulsano Taranto, İtalya

Julian Bernal Bernal itibaren 74026 Marina di Pulsano Taranto, İtalya

be_david

I bought this book last April 2010, skimmed it, set it aside. looked like another management book, not transformative (along the lines of say Good to Great). Yesterday on the twitter chat I host, a couple of people said it changed their lives. I thought that about Howard Gardners books on change. My mental models change. Picking it back up and reading it cover to cover in the last 24 hours, I can see why they related to it. the Heaths find a pattern for changing behavior that is simple, sensible, and memorable. They have three components - rational, emotional, and situational. They call them: Directing the Rider (rational, scripting critical moves, point to the destination); Motivate the Elephant (emotional, make it easy to comply, appeal to the image/pathos); and Shape the Path (situation the change.) They offer cases right and left. I liked the safety goggles in the factory story. 1. Rather than allow for ambiguity of "wear now" and "not now," the manager said to wear them all the time (Directing the rider.) 2. Instead of the nerdy goggles, they got new hip goggles to appeal to the macho staff (Motivating the herd). 3. A big blue line around the whole factory floor meant wear goggles inside this line. A cut out of a man dressed in safety clothes at the doors showed proper apparel and reminded them to don their goggles (Shape the path.) Safety rose 21% in a factory with an above-average safety record. the authors prove their points and make it simple to digest. I wont forget elephant, rider, and path. and as a futures/architect, change is part of my core business. Its useful to have another tool, for business, and for me. I immediately started thinking how to resituate some habits. Make a mission; make it easy to embrace the new habit.

be_david

Vowell's latest examination of history, Hawaii's annexation by the United States, is wry, witty, and charming as usual. Readers familiar with Hawaii and its history will enjoy Vowell's sharp take on the ancient Hawaiians and the missionaries who came to "save" them from paganism, while readers unfamiliar with the last state will gain an appreciation for its rich history and culture beyond its incarnation as a tourist paradise.